Day 25: Manti

Rounding out the national food countdown, today we feature manti, an Uzbek stuffed dumpling, likely spread all over Eurasia by the Mongols in the 13th century, and ever since as a staple food of travelers along the great silk road.  Like lag'mon, manti features prominently as an ethnic cuisine across the Turkic speaking world, and … Continue reading Day 25: Manti

Day 39: Somsa

Nothing says Uzbek street food like a savoury stuffed pastry.  Uzbekistan's answer to hot pockets (but way better), the somsa (or samsa/Самса) is an inescapable part of daily life in Uzbekistan, where taxi drivers and policemen line up for the tasty snacks early in the morning, and national food cafés and street kiosks light up … Continue reading Day 39: Somsa

Day 66: Bagrationi

Why, you might ask, is a Georgian restaurant being featured in a blog about Uzbekistan?  You probably wondered the same thing about the feature on Korean-Uzbek Cuisine.  While it's true that Stalin deported millions of Soviet citizens across the USSR, Georgian food, and more famously, Georgian wine, enjoyed a fine tradition of being considered a … Continue reading Day 66: Bagrationi

Day 69: Lagʻmon

Of the Central Asian dishes that bring me the most joy, Lagʻmon is in the top four, right up there with Plov, Manti, and Somsa.  Lagʻmon really shows off Uzbek cuisine's eastern influence with it's hearty homemade noodles, and delightful little chunks of meat and fat.  Served in a steaming bowl with a spoon and … Continue reading Day 69: Lagʻmon